Five Freedoms Agreement

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The Chicago International Air Transport Agreement, 1944 is called the Five Freedoms Agreement. It includes the two points in the Two Freedoms Agreement and three additional points. This agreement is popular as the Five Freedoms of Air / Air Space / Hijacking.

The freedom are:

  • The privilege of flying across its territory without landing and
  • The privilege of landing for non-traffic purpose (fuel refilling, maintenance, emergency etc.)
  • Privilege of putting down passengers, mail and cargo taken on in the territory of the State whose nationality the aircraft possesses.
  • Privilege of putting down passengers, mail and cargo destined for the territory of the State whose nationality the aircraft possesses.
  • Privilege of putting down passengers, mail and cargo destined for the territory of any other contracting State and the privilege to put down passengers, mail and cargo for any such territory.

Additional Freedoms

There are 4 more additional freedoms formulated but only the first five are signed and are recognized by the international treaty. The additional freedoms are:

  • The right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, of transporting, via the home State of the carrier, traffic moving between two other States
  • The right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, granted by one State to another State, of transporting traffic between the territory of the granting State and any third State with no requirement to include on such operation any point in the territory of the recipient State, i.e the service need not connect to or be an extension of any service to/from the home State of the carrier.
  • Consecutive cabotage: The right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, of transporting cabotage traffic between two points in the territory of the granting State on a service which originates or terminates in the home country of the foreign carrier or (in connection with the so-called Seventh Freedom of the Air) outside the territory of the granting State
  • Standalone cabotage: The right or privilege of transporting cabotage traffic of the granting State on a service performed entirely within the territory of the granting State

See Also

References

  • Manual on the Regulation of International Air Transport (Doc 9626, Part 4)