Doctrine of Legitimate Expectation

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HomeBrud.gifAdministrative LawBrud.gifDoctrine of Legitimate Expectation
  • Doctrine of Legitimate Expectation is a part of public law
  • Intended to give relief to people when they are not able to justify their claims on the basis of law in the strict sense
  • Rule of Locus standi is relaxed in public law
  • Provides space between 'no claim' and a 'legal claim'
  • Developed to check arbitrary excise of power of administrative authorities
  • The term 'Legitimate Expectation' was first used by Lord Denning in 1969
  • Government announced water schemes for villages but later excludes some villages. The announcement has set legitimate expectations and excluding villages without following Principles of Natural Justice is not fair.
  • 'Legitimate Expectation' is a modern development and is an example of judicial creativity.

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